Posts tagged ‘c-section’

June 12, 2011

how miss charlotte got here (and other news)

Have finally found some time** to write about how Miss Charlotte came into this world!  

I hope I don’t scare anyone (especially those with a strictly ordered birth plan) but telling this tale will be a cathartic exercise for yours truly, so here goes.

In early May, at 36 weeks pregnant, I went along to the hospital for one of the standard midwife appointments.

Everything during my pregnancy had gone smoothly and I had no reason to suspect anything was wrong.  The only thing I wanted the midwife to check was the baby’s position.

My doctor had suspected she was tranverse (lying sideways) and I agreed – although I couldnt discern hand from foot I seemed to only get kicking on one side of my belly.

Doc said she was still likely to move which was great news for me as I desperately wanted to avoid a c-section.

I asked the midwife to check bub’s position, hoping she had moved by this late stage, and was greatly relieved when she said that not only had the baby moved to the ideal position for birth but her head was engaged. Not long now til delivery day!

The midwife explained that if she had any concerns at all she would order an ultrasound to check the position but she was positive all was OK, and told me she had never in her career had an undiagnosed breech or transverse lying baby.

I left this appointment relieved, and excited for the upcoming arrival of our little one.

That Sunday (appropriatly enough being Mothers Day) I dreamt my waters had broken, after which I awoke to what felt like mild period pains.

In the back of my mind I thought ‘hey, this could be ealy labour’ but only being 36 weeks pregnant pushed the thoughts away, assuming they were only wishful thinking.

The ‘period pain’ got progressively worse throughout the morning however, and got to the point while out at the in-laws house for lunch that I was feeling pretty uncomfortable.

At this stage I dont think anyone (including me) thought I was in labour as the pains were bad, but I wasnt writhing around on the floor screaming as I thought I would be.

Nevertheless, we took early leave from lunch to go home, pack the rest of the hospital bag, and wait to see what happened next.

After a couple more hours and worsening pain, I called the hospital – I couldnt remember if I was meant to call when the pains were 5-7 minutes apart, or go to hospital at that stage.

When I called the phone service, I was advised that it was probably false labour and to have a panadol and wait it out.

Ignoring my gut instinct yet again, I agreed and relaxed on the couch assuming the pains would go away.

But go away they did not, and when I started bleeding a little with each pain (now even I was convinced these were contractions) I called the hotline again only to be told “this is the bloody show, you are probably still days away from true labour”.

OK, I thought, not wanting to be one of those women who rush to hospital only to be told to go home again (especally as we are a good 45 minute drive away, and by this stage is was around 8pm on Sunday night).

A couple of hours later I called the help line again – these pains werent going away, and were now stronger and closer together (although still not agony inducing – more like really bad period cramps).

A different midwife answered the call and, god bless her, suggested that it was still probbably false labour but as I was not yet at term to come in just to get everything checked out.

By the time we arrived at the hospital it was around 11pm. I was convinced I’d be sent back home after a quick check. 

But by 11:45 I’d been told I was already 7cm dilated and due to the baby being in breech position (damn that midwife!) I needed an emergency c-section.

Being petrified of the idea of a needle in my spine I asked if there was any way I could deliver naturally but due to baby’s position and my advanced stage of labour it was either the spinal block or a caesarean witout anaesthetic.  No prizes for guessing which one I chose!

Darling boy and I chatted during the op, he with camera at the ready, neither of us believing we would soon be proud parents.

After what seemed like an eternity we began to wonder what was taking so long.  Dont they just pull it out and sew me up?

At this stage, the surgeon leant over me and gave us the last news we could ever want to hear:  “We’ve got your baby out.  She’s not breathing, so we have to take her away. You’re losing a lot of blood due to a uterine tear so we’re going to have to put you under general anaesthetic now”.

WTF?? A minute ago we were looking forward to meeting our new baby and now…well now darling boy was being ushered out of the room and I was being put to sleep, thinking I had a stillborn baby and was about to have a hysterectomy.

When I awoke I was being wheeled into the intensive care nursery to meet our new daughter, all the while being filled in on what had happened over the past three hours.

Our baby Charlotte (which was a name we hadnt really considered but quickly agreed on) had a very rough start – apparently the drugs they gave me to stop uterine contractions once the c-section was underway hadn’t worked and when they tried to pull Lottie out my uterus had contracted around her neck.

This resulted in her having no oxygen for a significant amount of time without oxygen (the doctors couldnt say and gave us anywhere between 3 and 18 minute timeframes).

It also meant my uterus had to basically be torn open to get her out, resulting in more than two litres of blood lost.

Meeting our baby girl for the first time I felt a number of conflicting emotions – all with an anaesthetic induced hangover which made everything more surreal.

Lottie had tubes coming in and out of everywhere and at this stage we still had no idea what the prognosis was – would she survive? And if so, what effect would the trauma of birth have on her?

Turns out she is a little trooper.  Both of us had to spend over a week in hospital (I’d planned om a 12 hour quick discharge), but she was out of the intensive care nursery after day 5.

At her first checkup with the pediatrician, he told us that he had expected her to have a lot of problems when he read the report of her birth, before meeting her. 

But after a thorough exmaination he said that if he hadn’t known about the problems she encountered during birth he wouldnt have known there was anything wrong with her at all!

It’s still early days but it’s looking good for now, and to us she is the perfect little angel.

Moral of the story – go with your gut instinct and if you think something is wrong, insist on getting it checked out.  A mothers instinct is powerful and you shouldnt put all your faith in the medical profession (who, in my experience, are overworked and time poor, and often looking for a quick way out!).

** despite only taking probably 20 minutes in total to write this post, it has been a 6 day work in progress.  And I always thought those women who said babies take up a lot of time were exaggerating!

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January 20, 2011

c-section tension

Dawn Brown of Knees Up Mother Brown had a great post this week that really got me thinking.

She’s been advised that she may need to have a c-section if her baby’s position doesn’t change, and (understandably) has a few concerns:

“1) I hate the idea of a spinal/ edipural and not being able to feel my legs/lower body. This is probably my worst fear and it’s the one that gives me nightmares. I know if I have to have a c-section then it’s inevitable but I just hate the thought of it

2) I really don’t like the idea of not being able to sit up, cuddle and breastfeed the new baby as soon as it’s been born. Within minutes of Zara being born we were sat having cuddles and it was lovely, I don’t want the new baby to be wheeled away and I have to lie there being sewn up again etc before I see it again.

3) I really don’t like the idea of having to rely on midwives, nurses etc having to come and help me to lift the baby etc I’m really independent and I want to be capable of going and picking up the baby if it’s crying

4) I worry about how long it will take to heal afterwards, especially when I will also have a 15 month old toddler as well to look after, if I can’t lift anything or can’t drive then I’m going to be pretty much useless and it will drive me insane.”

I’m 100% behind Dawn here.

While of course all anyone cares about is a happy and healthy baby, the delivery method is such an emotional one for many mums to be.

Even before looking into it much, I knew I didn’t want an elective c-section as I kind of thought it was cheating.  In my eyes, it was like skipping the trek and getting dropped to Everest’s summit by helicopter.

Bear in mind I have no medical reasons whatsoever to even consider a caesarean and I don’t feel that other women are ‘cheating’ if they have one, for whatever reason.  For me though, it wouldn’t have felt right.

This is not to say that I didn’t always harbour hopes that I would be told a c-section was necessary and I’d get to bypass a long and painful natural birth on doctors orders – in my mind it’s different if you have to have one! I guess like attempting to climb Everest and only stopping because you broke your legs, not because you got tired or couldn’t be bothered with the trek.

However the more I discover about the (serious) operation the more I am running scared from a caesar.

For the reasons Dawn lists, and others:

My mum’s experience:

My mum had five kids – four ‘normal and one caesarean (that would be me).  Many, many, MANY times over the years she told my sisters and I how much worse a c-section was.

Much of this could be attributed to the fact that 1) it was 30 years ago and they are probably done differently these days and 2) it was an emergency Caesar so the scar (massive, muscle severing) was a lot bigger than you would find in an elective c-section.

She stressed to us how hard it was not being able to cough or sneeze properly for weeks, no being able to pick anything up easily (including baby) and even once she had been given the all clear it took ages for her to relax around anything that made her use that part of her body.

She also stressed how much longer the recovery was for a c-section compared with vaginal birth.  This however could have something to do with me being a late ‘surprise’ baby and her being a lot older than when she gave birth to my siblings.

The epidural:

Not so much being numb from the waist down that bothers me, more the needle into my spine, ugh – have long held a fear (probably unfounded) that if they slip Ill be paralysed for life.

Catheter:

Enough said.

The ‘repair’:

Stitches or staples, I don’t want either on my belly, thanks.  At least if I need to get them from a natural birth they’ll be out of sight, out of mind (or so I tell myself).

Regardless of these fears, I have plenty regarding a ‘normal’ birth as well!  Best not to think about it all really and just stay focused on the end prize – whatever happens it will be worth it.